Usefulness of Presepsin Concentrations for Differentiating Sepsis Severity

 

The importance of early detection and treatment of sepsis is critical for a better clinical outcome. For the quick diagnosis of sepsis, many sepsis biomarkers are commonly employed. This study looked into the diagnostic accuracy of presepsin, procalcitonin (PCT), and C-reactive protein (CRP) in distinguishing sepsis severity, as well as their link with the Sepsis-related Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score.

100 septic patients from two university clinical centres were enrolled in the trial during two time periods. The Sepsis-3 definitions were used to stratify the patients. Biomarkers and the SOFA score were measured four times during the illness. A sandwich ELISA kit was used to measure presepsin. A generalised linear mixed effects model was used to assess changes in biomarker concentrations and SOFA score values during the illness, as well as to quantify differences across severity groups. Multivariate analysis was used to look into the relationship between biomarkers and SOFA score.

Patients with septic shock (n=34) exhibited substantially higher presepsin concentrations on admission than patients with sepsis (n=66), with mean vs. SD of 128.547.6 ng/mL vs. 88.665.6 ng/mL, respectively (p0.001). PCT and CRP concentrations were not substantially different between sepsis severity groups. There was also a high association between presepsin and SOFA score (p0.0001).

Conclusions: In the research groups, presepsin showed a strong ability to differentiate septic shock from sepsis. The severity of sepsis was not differentiated by PCT or CRP.

Author(S) Details

Ajete Aliu-Bejta
ICU Department, University Clinic of Infectious Diseases, Alexander Flemingu, 10000 Pristina, Kosovo.

Anita Atelj
ICU Department, University Hospital for Infectious Diseases “Dr. Fran Mihaljevic”, Mirogojska 8, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia.

Mentor Kurshumliu
“PROLAB” Biochemical Laboratory, Mark Dizdari, 10000 Pristina, Kosovo.

Shemsedin Dreshaj
ICU Department, University Clinic of Infectious Diseases, Alexander Flemingu, 10000 Pristina, Kosovo.

Bruno Barsic
ICU Department, University Hospital for Infectious Diseases “Dr. Fran Mihaljevic”, Mirogojska 8, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia.

View Book:- https://stm.bookpi.org/NHMMR-V6/article/view/6437

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