Socio-Ecological Dynamics in Savanna Landscapes with Spatial and Temporal Contingencies

 

In order to make it easier to adapt earlier studies of savanna landscape change in settings with little human interaction to those that more accurately depict the socio-ecological context of southern Africa’s savannas, this study discusses the theoretical value of a contingencies framework in dynamic savanna systems. Studying and managing the savanna has included a lot of work on the processes underlying landscape changes. These dynamics have an effect on human populations, animal populations, carbon storage, and overall spatio-temporal dynamism in response to both anthropogenic and climatic changes. Landscapes can be explained simply as the result of geographically and historically contingent movements of energy and matter. Additionally, scale affects how these contingencies are observed. Both biophysical and human agents of change can be distinguished by distinguishing their unique spatial, temporal, and organisational variables. We contend, however, that a significant portion of research on savannas has either treated humans as exogenous (for example, by enacting regional or global policies) or as geographically and temporally detached from the system (e.g., as in many protected areas with limited current human habitation).

 

Author (s) Details

Kelley A. Crews
Department of Geography & the Environment, The University of Texas at Austin, 305 E. 23rd Street, CLA 3.306, Austin, TX 78712, USA.

Kenneth R. Young
Department of Geography & the Environment, The University of Texas at Austin, 305 E. 23rd Street, CLA 3.306, Austin, TX 78712, USA.

 

View Book :-  https://stm.bookpi.org/ECEES-V4/article/view/7578

 

Keywords Р Contingencies, landscape change, landscape legacies, ecological succession, savannas, socio-ecological systems, scale

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