Role of Microbes and their Enzymes in Biodegradation of Plastic Waste

 One of the biggest concerns of the twenty-first century is the long-term use of synthetic polymers. Plastic polymers with varied qualities have been produced during the last 150 years to replace materials such as metal, glass, and wood in a variety of applications. Plastic is a non-reactive, non-biodegradable material. As a result, the amount of plastic waste produced has increased exponentially. Due to their undesired accumulation in landfills, leaching into the soil, increasing greenhouse gas emissions, and other factors, plastic trash has had a negative impact on life on Earth. Plastic pollution is a major source of pollution in the environment, and it is a growing ecological danger. The present techniques for removing plastic trash, such as burning, landfilling, and recycling, create a greater load on the environment. As a result, the potential for biological systems to breakdown synthetic plastics has recently gotten a lot of attention. These polymers have been proven to be used by microorganisms and converted into environmentally benign carbon compounds. The present state of knowledge on microbes’ biochemical roles in increasing the degradation of synthetic plastics is discussed.

Author(s) Details:

B. Saritha,
Centre for Climate Change, Environmental Management and Policy Research Institute, Bangalore, Karnataka, India.

O. K. Remadevi,
Centre for Climate Change, Environmental Management and Policy Research Institute, Bangalore, Karnataka, India.

Please see the link here: https://stm.bookpi.org/IMB-V4/article/view/6223

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