News Update on Organic Manure Research: Dec – 2019

Organic manure phosphorus accumulation, mobility and management

Organic manures are a crucial source of P which may make a big economic contribution to farm fertilizer policies. within the region of 119000 tonnes of P are returned annually to UK agricultural land within the sort of manures collected and handled on farms, with an estimated 66000 tonnes of P applied to tillage land and 53000 tonnes to grassland.

Previous research on the use of manure P has attended indicate a lower efficiency compared to inorganic fertilizer P within the season following application, but within the long run manure and fertilizer P are often considered equivalent. Failure to adequately account for manure P additions to the land may end in soil enrichment which could increase the agricultural contribution to eutrophication, as a results of surface runoff or leaching. [1]

The effects of mineral fertilizer and organic manure on soil microbial community and diversity

The effects of mineral fertilizer (NPK) and organic manure on phospholipid carboxylic acid profiles and microbial functional diversity were investigated during a long-term (21-year) fertilizer experiment. The experiment included nine treatments: organic manure (OM), organic manure plus fertilizer NPK (OM + NPK), fertilizer NPK (NPK), fertilizer NP (NP), fertilizer NK (NK), fertilizer N (N), fertilizer P (P), fertilizer K (K), and therefore the control (CK, without fertilization). the first soil was extremely eroded, characterized by low pH and deficiencies of nutrients, particularly N and P. the appliance of OM and OM + NPK greatly increased crop yields, soil pH, organic C, total N, P and K, available N, P and K content. Crop yields, soil pH, organic C, total N and available N were also clearly increased by the appliance of mineral NPK fertilizer. [2]

Organic manure stimulates biological activity and barley growth in soil subject to secondary salinization

A pot experiment was performed to match the impact of organic manure on soil enzymatic activity, respiration rate and therefore the growth of two barley cultivars (Hordeum vulgare L.) differing in their salt tolerance under a simulated salinized environment. A plastic pot with a hole (2 cm in diameter) within the center of bottom was crammed with an anthropogenic (paddy) soil and placed during a porcelain container containing NaCl solution (3.0 g L−1) such a secondary salinization process was simulated via upward capillary water movement along the profile. A treatment with neither organic manure nor simulated soil salinization was taken as an impact (CK1). The organic manure was applied either inside or outside rhizobag made from nylon cloth (40 μm of pore size). [3]

Impacts of Long-term Fertilization on the Molecular Structure of Humic Acid and Organic Carbon Content in Soil Aggregates in Black Soil

Soil aggregates are the essential units of soil structure, and their composition and carbon (C) stability directly affect soil fertility. As cementing agents, humic substances play a crucial role within the formation and stability of soil aggregates. Long-term fertilization not only changes the structure of humic substance (HA), but also affects the content and stability of organic C in soil aggregates. during this study, supported a long-term fertilization experiment, the connection between the molecular structure of HA and therefore the stability of organic C within the aggregates was examined. Compared with the non-fertilization control (CK), both the appliance of organic manure alone (M) and organic manure combined with inorganic fertilizer application (MNPK) increased organic C content within the bulk soil and in HA. [4]

Response of Jew’s Mallow (Corchorus olitorius L.) to Organic Manures in the Southern Guinea Savanna Agroecological Zone of Nigeria

Field trials were conducted in 2014 and 2015 cropping seasons at the Teaching and Research Farm of Crop Science Department of the Taraba State College of Agriculture, Jalingo (Latitude 80° 50” N and Longitude 11° 50” E) to work out the response of Jew’s mallow (Corchorus olitorius (L.) to differing types of organic manures. Treatments evaluated consisted of three.0 t/ha each of 4 sorts of organic manures viz: poultry droppings, cow dung, sheep manure and goat manure with zero manure as control. Each treatment was replicated fourfold and laid call at a randomized complete block design (RCBD). Data collected included plant height, leaf length and width, and leaves yield/ha. [5]

Reference

[1] Smith, K.A., Chalmers, A.G., Chambers, B.J. and Christie, P., 1998. Organic manure phosphorus accumulation, mobility and management. Soil Use and Management, 14, (Web Link)

[2] Zhong, W., Gu, T., Wang, W., Zhang, B., Lin, X., Huang, Q. and Shen, W., 2010. The effects of mineral fertilizer and organic manure on soil microbial community and diversity. Plant and soil, 326(1-2), (Web Link)

[3] Liang, Y., Si, J., Nikolic, M., Peng, Y., Chen, W. and Jiang, Y., 2005. Organic manure stimulates biological activity and barley growth in soil subject to secondary salinization. Soil Biology and Biochemistry, 37(6), (Web Link)

[4] Impacts of Long-term Fertilization on the Molecular Structure of Humic Acid and Organic Carbon Content in Soil Aggregates in Black Soil
Jiuming Zhang, Fengqin Chi, Dan Wei, Baoku Zhou, Shanshan Cai, Yan Li, Enjun Kuang, Lei Sun & Lu-Jun Li
Scientific Reports volume 9, (Web Link)

[5] A. Garjila, Y., O. Shiyam, J. and Augustine, Y. (2017) “Response of Jew’s Mallow (Corchorus olitorius L.) to Organic Manures in the Southern Guinea Savanna Agroecological Zone of Nigeria”, Asian Research Journal of Agriculture, 3(1), (Web Link)

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