News Update on Emotional Intelligence Research: Jan – 2020

Emotional Intelligence

This article presents a framework for emotional intelligence, a gaggle of skills hypothesized to contribute to the accurate appraisal and expression of emotion in oneself and in others, the effective regulation of emotion in self et al. , and thus the utilization of feelings to motivate, plan, and achieve in one’s life. We start by reviewing the mention the adaptive versus maladaptive qualities of emotion. We then explore the literature on intelligence, and particularly social intelligence, to seem at the place of emotion in traditional intelligence conceptions. A framework for integrating the research on emotion-related skills is then described. Next, we review the components of emotional intelligence. [1]

Emotional development and emotional intelligence: Educational implications.

The authors define emotional intelligence because the power to observe one’s own and others’ feelings and emotions, to discriminate among them, and to use this information to guide one’s thinking and action.

This book consists of chapters that present research on emotions and emotional development during a fashion useful to educators, psychologists, and anyone interested by the unfolding of emotions during childhood. The book links theory and practice by juxtaposing scientific explanations of emotion with short commentaries from educators who elaborate on how these advances are often put to use within the classroom. The book provides ample evidence about emotional intelligence also as sound information on the potential efficacy of educational programs supported this idea. [2]

Emotional intelligence meets traditional standards for an intelligence

An intelligence must meet several standard criteria before it are often considered scientifically legitimate. First, it should be capable of being operationalized as a gaggle of abilities. Second, it should meet certain correlational criteria: the talents defined by the intelligence should form a related set (i.e., be intercorrelated), and be related to pre-existing intelligences, while also showing some unique variance. Third, the talents of the intelligence should develop with age and knowledge . In two studies, adults (N=503) and adolescents (N=229) took a replacement , 12-subscale ability test of emotional intelligence: the Multifactor Emotional Intelligence Scale (MEIS). this studies show that emotional intelligence, as measured by the MEIS, meets the above three classical criteria of a typical intelligence. [3]

Examining brain structures associated with dispositional envy and the mediation role of emotional intelligence

Dispositional envy is distinguished by definition and neurally from episodic envy. While the neural correlates of episodic envy are evaluated by specific tasks in previous studies, little is known about the structural neural basis of dispositional envy. during this study, we investigated the structural neural basis of dispositional envy underlying individual differences across two independent samples comprising an entire of 100 young healthy adults. Firstly, 73 subjects’ data (sample 1) was analyzed, which we assessed the association between regional gray matter volume (rGMV) and dispositional envy using voxel-based morphometry (VBM). Furthermore, we explored the role of emotional intelligence within the association between GMV and dispositional envy. [4]

Emotional Intelligence and Its Relationship to the Moderating Effect of Gender on the Students of Tafila Technical University

This study aims to identify the extent of emotional intelligence of the students of Tafilah Technical University; additionally to finding out whether there are differences in levels of emotional intelligence amongst the two genders. A sample with 222 university students was selected, of which 117 were males, and 105 were females. the dimensions of emotional intelligence consisted of 41 phrases, which has five Likert steps, and thus the size has three levels, viz., low, medium, and high. [5]

Reference

[1] Salovey, P. and Mayer, J.D., 1990. Emotional intelligence. Imagination, cognition and personality, 9(3), (Web Link)

[2] Salovey, P.E. and Sluyter, D.J., 1997. Emotional development and emotional intelligence: Educational implications. Basic Books. (Web Link)

[3] Mayer, J.D., Caruso, D.R. and Salovey, P., 1999. Emotional intelligence meets traditional standards for an intelligence. Intelligence, 27(4), (Web Link)

[4] Examining brain structures associated with dispositional envy and the mediation role of emotional intelligence
Yanhui Xiang, Sasa Zhao, Hanlin Wang, Qihan Wu, Feng Kong & Lei Mo
Scientific Reports volume 7, (Web Link)

[5] Al-Kfaween, E. M. (2018) “Emotional Intelligence and Its Relationship to the Moderating Effect of Gender on the Students of Tafila Technical University”, Journal of Education, Society and Behavioural Science, 25(2), (Web Link)

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