News Update on Educational Management: Feb-2020

Educational management in modern conditions

Education in a broad social and economic sense must allow students to make desirable social changes and, at the same time, preserve the desired and positive aspects of the existing culture. Educational management is an applied field of management. The characteristics that could be called leadership ones are closer to the less frequent ones in the list: these are the means of “soft power”. [1]

 

Contributions of the internet of things in education as support tool in the educational management decision-making process 

The aim of this paper is to understand the contributions that the development of IoT provides to education, particularly in assisting the decision-making process and addressing some of the challenges that the educational system faces. The study adopts a qualitative approach and applies bibliographic overview procedures that substantiate ‘internet of things’ concepts in education and the decision-making process in education, as well as analysing the phenomena in the light of contingency theory precepts. [2]

 

Why has critical realism not been used more in educational leadership and management research? A critical realist exploration

 Critical realism is an established post-positivist philosophy applied by researchers in a number of fields and yet it is little used in educational leadership and management (ELM) research. This article responds to calls from the field for a more critical approach to educational leadership and management research by offering critical realism as a way to address these concerns and it explores why critical realism has not featured more in the field, particularly as it could provide that more critical approach. [3]

 

Educational Management in the Light of Islamic Standards

 The purpose of this study was threefold: (1) Investigate educational management and its characteristics in terms of the Islamic concept of management in this era of globalisation; (2) Identify attributes of leadership of the principals and their compatibility with Islamic standards derived from the Holy Quran, the Sunnah and the Prophet’s Traditions; and (3) Establish the impacts of globalisation on Islamic management. [4]

 

Poverty: A Major Challenge to the African Rural Educational System Development and the Way Forward (Review)

 Considering the significance of rural poverty across the continent of Africa, it should come as no surprise that rural school children are the most disadvantaged from a socioeconomic perspective when it comes to access to a quality education. Rural schools generally have less qualified teachers and not enough teachers for the number of children enrolled in school. This is clearly evident in the low teachers-per-school ratios and teacher-to-pupil ratios in most rural African regions. The reasons for these low numbers in rural Africa are many and very much linked to poverty and other inequalities and socioeconomic conditions. [5]

 

Reference

[1] Haila, A.A., 2020. Educational management in modern conditions. In World economy and international economic relations (Vol. 3, pp. 71-75).

 

[2] Silva, R., Bernardo, C.D.P., Watanabe, C.Y.V., Silva, R.M.P.D. and Neto, J.M.D.S., 2020. Contributions of the internet of things in education as support tool in the educational management decision-making process. International Journal of Innovation and Learning, 27(2), pp.175-196.

 

[3] Thorpe, A., 2020. Why has critical realism not been used more in educational leadership and management research? A critical realist exploration. Journal of Critical Realism, 19(1), pp.29-44.

 

[4] Alkrdem, M. and Alqahtani, A. (2016) “Educational Management in the Light of Islamic Standards”, Journal of Education, Society and Behavioural Science, 14(3), pp. 1-9. doi: 10.9734/BJESBS/2016/22671.

 

[5] Okeowhor, D., Okoh, J., Baakel, A. and Okolo, O. (2019) “Poverty: A Major Challenge to the African Rural Educational System Development and the Way Forward (Review)”, Asian Journal of Education and Social Studies, 3(3), pp. 1-7. doi: 10.9734/ajess/2019/v3i330098.

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