Latest News on Career Influence : July – 2020

The influence of race on career dynamics: Theory and research on minority career experiences

concerned with understanding how race and race relations influence career dynamics / focus of this review . . . is on identifying and interpreting the aspects of this research that have implications for other racial minorities as well as black Americans

two theories are presented that help us to understand the influence of group and organizational forces and their differential impact on the career experiences of minorities and whites

biculturalism / racial identity / developmental relationships / gender and race in the workplace / the dynamics of inclusion / (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved) [1]

Personal Constructions of Parental Influence Relatied to Career Development

Psychological researchers, influenced by sociological and ecological approaches to human development, have begun to question the lack of attention to interactive processes in the family related to the career development of adolescents and young adults. The purpose of the present study was to explore the ways parents and young adults socially construct the interactive domain of parental influence. A sample of 279 parents and young adults were randomly assigned to complete a Q-sort set describing various family activities and interactions thought to influence career development Consistent with Qmethodology, factor analyses were conducted for subjects rather than items, followed by qualitative analyses. Results revealed that interactions perceived as key elements in career development refer to either the process or outcomes of parental influence and address responsibility, autonomy, open communication, support and encouragement, and direction and guidance. The results are discussed in light of the theoretical perspective proposed [2]

The influence of racism and sexism in the career development of African American women

In order to survive the effects of dual discrimination in the workplace, Black women have developed a coping system. A component of that system might be seen as avoidance of potentially harmful working environments. Black women have typically avoided those career fields in which they perceive or anticipate a pattern of discrimination. Another component of the coping system has been a process of lowering or altering career goals (e.g., P. Gurin and A. Pruitt, 1978). (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved) [3]

 

Influence of Work-Family Conflict and Perceived Social Support on Marital Satisfaction of Individuals with Dual-Career Family in Oyo, Nigeria

Aims: This study examined the influence of Work-Family Conflict (WFC) and Perceived Social Support (PSS) on marital satisfaction of individuals with dual-career family.

Study Design: The study adopted a correlational research approach

Place and Duration of Study: The study took place at the Department of Educational Psychology, Emmanuel Alayande College of Education, Oyo, Oyo State, Nigeria, between May and August, 2012.

Methodology: Participants in the study include one hundred and fifty-eight married individuals who were dual-earners selected through a purposive random sampling technique in Oyo area of Oyo State, Nigeria. Three research instruments were employed to elicit response from the participants namely: Index of Marital Satisfaction; Multi-dimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support and Work-Family Conflict Scale. Three research questions were raised. Pearson Product Moment Correlation and Multiple regression models were used for analysis of data generated.

Results: The outcomes of the study revealed that the two predictor variables jointly accounted for about 25% of the total variation (F (2,155) = 25.170; R=.495; R2=.245; Adj. R2=.235; P<0.001). Also, the two independent variables contributed independently to the prediction of marital satisfaction: Work-family conflict (β=-.468; t=-.690, P<0.001). Perceived social support (β=.195, t=2.787, P=0.006). While the relationship between WFC and Marital Satisfaction was negative, the relationship was positive for PSS and Marital Satisfaction.

Conclusion: The two independent variables examined in this study are potent enough to influence marital satisfaction. The study therefore concluded that marital satisfaction can increase when work-family strain is properly managed and individuals in dual-career relationship receive the needed social supports from expected individuals. [4]

Influence of Demographic Factors and Pay Satisfaction on Career Satisfaction among Selected Employees in Redeemer’s University

This study explores the influence of demographic factors and pay satisfaction and on career satisfaction among selected employees of Redeemer’s University, Osun State, Nigeria. The study adopted a cross sectional survey research design and simple random sampling technique were used to select two hundred and twelve (212) participants (M=97 males; F= 115 females) among both academic and non-academic staffs. The Biodata form, Pay Satisfaction Scale (PSS) and Career Satisfaction Scale (CSS) were used to collect data which were further analyzed through independent t-test. The results hence revealed that there were significant differences in career satisfaction of participants among the variables of marital status (t = 1.96 p<0.05), designation (t = 2.64 p<0.05) and pay satisfaction (t = 6.41 p<0.05).  While there were no significant differences in the variables of gender (t = 0.78 p>0.05) and age (t = 1.74 p>0.05). The implication of these findings substantiates the importance of creating a conducive working environment and an equity reward system in order to improve employees’ career satisfaction. [5]

Reference

[1] Thomas, D.A. and Alderfer, C.P., 1989. The influence of race on career dynamics: Theory and research on minority career experiences.

[2] Young, R.A., Friesen, J.D. and Dillabough, J.A.M., 1991. Personal constructions of parental influence relatied to career development. Canadian Journal of Counselling and Psychotherapy, 25(2).

[3] Evans, K.M. and Herr, E.L., 1991. The influence of racism and sexism in the career development of African American women. Journal of Multicultural Counseling and Development.

[4] Akanbi, S. and Oyewo, N. (2014) “Influence of Work-Family Conflict and Perceived Social Support on Marital Satisfaction of Individuals with Dual-Career Family in Oyo, Nigeria”, Journal of Education, Society and Behavioural Science, 4(10), pp. 1400-1411. doi: 10.9734/BJESBS/2014/9114.

[5] T. Arogundade, O. and Aremu, O. (2017) “Influence of Demographic Factors and Pay Satisfaction on Career Satisfaction among Selected Employees in Redeemer’s University”, Asian Research Journal of Arts & Social Sciences, 3(1), pp. 1-6. doi: 10.9734/ARJASS/2017/33064.

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