Lateral Flow Assays are Essential Tools in the Battle against Infectious Diseases and are Crucial in the Long-term Control of Sleeping Sickness

Parasitic pathogens that are still causing severe human suffering in sub-Saharan Africa are Sleeping Sickness or Human African Trypanosomosis (HAT) and associated Animal African Trypanosomosis (AAT) diseases. In recent years, the monitoring of trypanosomosis has improved with the implementation of point-of – care lateral flow diagnostic assays (LFAs), leading to a substantial reduction in the number of human infections. Although this alone provides evidence of the strength of systemic testing, the decrease in case prevalence results in a new demand for better potential screening tools, with a focus on enhanced positive predictive value (PPV) although retaining the high specificity and sensitivity of current tests. This chapter first outlines the technical specifics of the various LFA formats available today and will subsequently cover the achievements and challenges of the latest trypanosomosis LFAs available, as well as the recently released prototype designs.

Author (s) Details

Zeng Li
Laboratory for Cellular and Molecular Immunology (CMIM), Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Pleinlaan 2, 1050 Brussel, Belgium and Laboratory of Medical Biochemistry (LMB) and the Infla-Med Centre of Excellence, University of Antwerp, Campus Drie Eiken, Universiteitsplein 1, 2610 Wilrijk, Belgium.

Joar Esteban Pinto Torres
Laboratory for Cellular and Molecular Immunology (CMIM), Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Pleinlaan 2, 1050 Brussel, Belgium.

Yann G. J. Sterckx

Laboratory of Medical Biochemistry (LMB) and the Infla-Med Centre of Excellence, University of Antwerp, Campus Drie Eiken, Universiteitsplein 1, 2610 Wilrijk, Belgium.

Magdalena Radwanska
Department of Biomedical Molecular Biology, Universiteit Gent, Technologiepark Zwijnaarde 71, 9052 Gent, Belgium and Center for Biomedical Research, Ghent University Global Campus, Songdomunhwa-Ro 119-5, Yeonsu-Gu, 406-840 Incheon, South Korea.

 

Stefan Magez
Laboratory for Cellular and Molecular Immunology (CMIM), Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Pleinlaan 2, 1050 Brussel, Belgium and Center for Biomedical Research, Ghent University Global Campus, Songdomunhwa-Ro 119-5, Yeonsu-Gu, 406-840 Incheon, South Korea and Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, Universiteit Gent, Ledeganckstraat 35, 9000 Gent, Belgium.

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