Isolation and Molecular Identification of Vibrio spp. by Sequencing of 16S rDNA from Seafood, Meat and Meat Products in Libya: A Descriptive Study

 The study’s major goal was to define microorganisms obtained from seafood, meat, and meat products that could cause food poisoning. We intend to use this information to establish a baseline for future foodborne illness studies in Libya. Septicemia, cholera, and milder forms of gastroenteritis are all caused by food-borne microbes in the genus Vibrio. Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio parahemolyticus, and Vibrio vulnificus are some of the Vibrio species that are commonly associated with foodborne transmission. A total of 93 samples of seafood, meat, and meat products (Table 1) were randomly collected from different geographic locations in Libya [Tripoli, Regdalin (120 km west of Tripoli), Janzour (30 km west of Tripoli), and Tobruk (1400 km east of Tripoli)]: 21 shrimps, 5 clams, 20 fish, 34 samples of raw meat (10 beef, 9 camel meat, 6 mutton, and 9 chickens), and 13 samples of meat products (2 beef sausages, 5 Each sample weighed 250 grammes. Only 48 (51.6%) of the 93 cultivated samples developed colonies on Thiosulfate Citrate Bile Salt agar (TCBS) with Vibrio spp. culture characteristics. On TCBS, more than half (n=27) of processed seafood samples (n=46) yielded colonies, whereas only 44.6 percent of meat and meat product samples yielded colonies. The highest bacterial count among cultivated seafood samples was found in clams, which had a level of 3.8X104 CFUg. With 6.5X104 CFUg, chicken burger samples had the highest bacterial count. Molecular examination of the isolates acquired in this investigation revealed that Vibrio spp. were found in 11 of the 48 samples (22.9 percent). For the first time, Vibrio parahemolyticus was isolated from camel meat. Finally, morphological features extracted from morphological cultural characteristics on the selected TCBS agar media were used to presumptively identify the retrieved Vibrio parahemolyticus and V. harveyi.

Author(s) Details:

S. M. Azwai,
Department of Microbiology and Parasitology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tripoli, P.O. Box-13662, Tripoli, Libya.

E. A. Alfallani,
Department of Microbiology and Parasitology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tripoli, P.O. Box-13662, Tripoli, Libya.

S. K. Abolghait,
Department of Food Hygiene and Control, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Suez Canal University, Ismailia-41522, Egypt.

A. M. Garbaj,
Department of Food Hygiene and Control, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tripoli, P.O. Box-13662, Tripoli, Libya.

H. T. Naas,
Department of Food Hygiene and Control, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tripoli, P.O. Box-13662, Tripoli, Libya.

A. A. Moawad,
Department of Food Hygiene and Control, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Cairo University, Giza-12211, Egypt.

F. T. Gammoudi,
Department of Microbiology and Parasitology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tripoli, P.O. Box-13662, Tripoli, Libya.

H. M. Rayes,
Department of Microbiology and Parasitology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tripoli, P.O. Box-13662, Tripoli, Libya.

I. Barbieri,
Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale della Lombardia e dell’ Emilia Romagna, Via Bianchi, 9 – 25124 Brescia, Italy.

I. M. Eldaghayes,
Department of Microbiology and Parasitology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tripoli, P.O. Box-13662, Tripoli, Libya.

Please see the link here: https://stm.bookpi.org/IMB-V4/article/view/6230

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