Bone Mineral Density and Serum Minerals in Pre and Post-Menopausal Women: A Comparative Study

Osteoporosis is a bone disease that causes bone thinning and raises the risk of fractures. It literally means “porous bone,” and it causes bone mass and strength to deteriorate. As the illness progresses, symptoms and pain become less common. Although the exact explanation is unknown, it can be avoided. After the age of 35, bone breakdown outpaces bone synthesis, resulting in a gradual decrease of bone mass. When bone loss exceeds a certain threshold, osteoporosis is diagnosed. After menopause, bone resorption (breakdown) outpaces bone production. Osteoporosis is a silent disease that manifests itself only as a decrease in bone density until a fracture occurs. Osteoporosis is one of the most rapidly increasing health issues among postmenopausal women. Osteoporotic fractures are increasingly recognised as a leading cause of illness and mortality among India’s older women.

The goal of this study was to see if there was a link between serum minerals and bone mineral density (BMD) in premenopausal and postmenopausal women.

The goal of this study was to determine serum mineral levels and their relationship to bone mineral density in premenopausal and postmenopausal women. The current research was conducted in a cross-sectional manner. For the study, 40 women were chosen from each group, premenopausal and postmenopausal, who had no medical, surgical, or gynaecological problems. Bone Mineral Density (BMD) was assessed using a Bone Densitometer, and T-score was used to classify the results as normal, osteopenia, or osteoporosis. In an autoanalyser, the minerals in the blood were measured. Microsoft Excel 2007 was used to examine the data. The students’,,t” test was used to compare values between groups, and Pearson’s correlation coefficient was utilised to determine the correlation.

The findings show that approximately 80% of postmenopausal women are osteoporotic. When compared to premenopausal women, postmenopausal women had significantly lower BMD scores and significantly lower serum mineral levels, according to T-score. In postmenopausal women, there was a strong positive connection between T-score and serum calcium and magnesium levels.

Conclusions: According to the findings, perimenopausal and postmenopausal women should consume magnesium-rich foods such as whole grains, legumes, fruits and vegetables (especially dark-green, leafy vegetables) on a daily basis to meet recommended magnesium intakes and maintain normal magnesium storage levels. Supplementation in the form of pills can be administered if these foods are not available or if serum levels are too low.

Author(S) Details

Sasmita Mishra
Department of Biochemistry, A.V.M.C & H, Pondicherry, India.

M. Manju
Department of Biochemistry, A.V.M.C & H, Pondicherry, India.

B. D. Toora
Department of Biochemistry, A.V.M.C & H, Pondicherry, India.

S. Mohan
Department of Biochemistry, A.V.M.C & H, Pondicherry, India.

B. P. Venkatesh
Department of Radiology, A.V.M.C & H, Pondicherry, India.

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