News Update on Methanolic Extract Research: May – 2019

Antiulcerogenic effect of methanolic extract of Emblica officinalis: an experimental study

The lesion protecting potential of methanolic extract of Emblica officinalis Gaertn. (EOE) was assessed in several acute peptic ulcer models in rats induced  by acetylsalicylic acid, ethanol, cold restraint stress and orifice tying and healing impact in chronic stomachic ulcers induced  by ethanoic acid in rats. EOE, 10–50 mg/kg administered orally, doubly daily for five days showed dose-dependent lesion protecting effects altogether the on top of acute lesion models (36.0–98.3% protection, P. [1]

In vitro trypanocidal effect of methanolic extract of some Nigerian savannah plants

Methanol extracts from twenty 3 plants harvested from the Savannah vegetation belt of African nation were analyzed in vitro for trypanocidal activity against Trypanosoma brucei brucei and Trypanosoma congolense at concentrations of four mg/ml, 0.4 mg/ml and zero.04 mg/ml. Extracts of genus Khaya senegalensis, Piliostigma reticulatum, Securidaca longepedunculata and Terminalia avicennoides were powerfully trypanocidal to each organisms whereas extracts of Anchomanes difformis, Cassytha spp, Lannea kerstingii, Parkia clappertioniana, Striga spp, angiospermous tree and genus Prosopis africana were trypanocidal to either T. brucei brucei or T. congolense. These findings offer proof of the results of some plants within the ancient management of trypanosomiasis. [2]

Laboratory evaluation of methanolic extract of Atlantia monophylla (Family: Rutaceae) against immature stages of mosquitoes and non-target organisms

Methanolic extracts of the leaves of Atlantia monophylla (Rutaceae) were evaluated for dipterous insectcidal activity against immature stages of 3 mosquito species, mosquito, genus Anopheles stephensi, and Aedes aegypti within the laboratory.Larvae of 110. quinquefasciatus and pupae of Associate in Nursing. stephensi were found additional prone, with LC50 values of zero.14 mg/l and zero.05 mg/l, severally. Insect growth control activity of this extract was additional pronounced against Ae. aegypti, with EI50 worth zero.002 mg/l. The extract was found safe to aquatic dipterous insect predators poeciliid, Poecilia reticulata, and Diplonychus indicus, with the individual LC50 values of twenty three.4, 21.3, and 5.7 mg/l. The results indicate that the mosquitocidal effects of the extract of this plant were appreciate nim tree extract and sure artificial chemical larvicides like fenthion, methoprene, etc. [3]

Leaf Disc Assays for Rapid Measurement of Antioxidant Activity

Antioxidant levels square measure key parameters for studies of food quality, stress responses, and plant health. Herein, we’ve incontestable  that excised leaf disc has each radical scavenging activity and reducing power, and used this idea to develop two,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), 2,2′-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS), and permanganate reduction (PPR) leaf disc assays. time interval and chemical agent concentration for these assays were optimized victimisation leaves from spinach, kale, collards, mustard, and watermelon. Further, these assays were valid for one-dimensionality and intra-assay exactness. Ultra-high performance liquid natural process coupled to AN electrospray quadrupole time-of-flight spectrometer (UPLC/ESI-HR-QTOFMS) was used for phytochemical identification and learning relative abundances of bound phenolic resin compounds in numerous leaf discs suspended and acellular extracts. The mass spectral analysis showed that leaf disc suspended methanolic extracts had nearly same phytochemical profiles to those of acellular extracts. The DPPH leaf disc assay incontestable  higher radical scavenging potential than the standard acellular extract technique. in contrast, the discovered inhibitor activity values in ABTS and PPR leaf disc assays were below those of typical acellular extract-based strategies. last, the developed leaf disc assays square measure easy and speedy for the qualitative and comparative assessment of the inhibitor potential of leaf samples, likewise as may be a decent various to traditional acellular extract based mostly strategies. [4]

In vitro Evaluation of Antidiabetic and Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Ethanolic and Methanolic Extracts of Ceropegia juncea

Antidiabetic and anti inflammatory activity of fermentation alcohol and alcohol extracts of in vivo and in vitro plants of Ceropegia juncea were evaluated by in vitro ways. medication activity was studied exploitation α-amylase repressive assay and α-Glycosidase inhibitory assay. In vitro medicinal drug activity was evaluated exploitation simple protein denaturation assay and membrane stabilization assay. Results showed that the in vivo and in vitro plant fermentation alcohol and alcohol extracts exhibited vital activity with α-amylase repressive assay and α-Glycosidase inhibitory activity with IC50 values of 434.75±1.40, 578.16±0.09, 555.9±0.28, 748.35±0.58 µg/ml and 752.94±0.82, 797.17±1.02, 877.09±0.74 and 959.86±0.26 µg/ml severally. The extracts conjointly showed in vitro medicinal drug activity by inhibiting the warmth iatrogenic simple protein denaturation and human red somatic cell membrane (HRBC) stabilization with the IC50 values of 376±1.21, 372±0.92, 396±0.84, 344±01.08 µg/ml and 376±0.89, 910±1.06, 760±0.56, 810±0.12 µg/ml severally. Thus, the each in vivo and in vitro plants of C. juncea might probably be wealthy sources of natural medication and anti inflammatory medicine. From the results, it’s over that the metabolites gift in vitro plant is nearly just like that of in vivo plant. So, in vitro plants are often used for healthful purpose rather than in vivo plants. [5]

Reference

[1] Sairam, K.C.H.V., Rao, C.V., Babu, M.D., Kumar, K.V., Agrawal, V.K. and Goel, R.K., 2002. Antiulcerogenic effect of methanolic extract of Emblica officinalis: an experimental study. Journal of Ethnopharmacology, 82(1), pp.1-9. (Web Link)

[2] Atawodi, S.E., Bulus, T., Ibrahim, S., Ameh, D.A., Nok, A.J., Mamman, M. and Galadima, M., 2003. In vitro trypanocidal effect of methanolic extract of some Nigerian savannah plants. African Journal of Biotechnology, 2(9), pp.317-321. (Web Link)

[3] Sivagnaname, N. and Kalyanasundaram, M., 2004. Laboratory evaluation of methanolic extract of Atlantia monophylla (Family: Rutaceae) against immature stages of mosquitoes and non-target organisms. Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, 99(1), pp.115-118. (Web Link)

[4] Leaf Disc Assays for Rapid Measurement of Antioxidant Activity

Deepak M. Kasote, Guddadarangavvanahally K. Jayaprakasha & Bhimanagouda S. Patil

Scientific Reportsvolume 9, Article number: 1884 (2019) (Web Link)

[5] Saraswathy, M., Kalimuthu, K., Chinnadurai, V. and Juliet, Y. S. (2017) “In vitro Evaluation of Antidiabetic and Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Ethanolic and Methanolic Extracts of Ceropegia juncea”, Journal of Pharmaceutical Research International, 15(2), pp. 1-9. doi: 10.9734/BJPR/2017/32020. (Web Link)

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