ROADS, ROADSIDES AND WILDLIFE CONSERVATION: A REVIEW

Roads are transport corridors imposed on the environment by humans for the movement of people and materials. Road systems are extensive in length and in the area that they occupy, and they extend pervasively throughout most terrestrial landscapes and habitats. [1]

Wildlife value orientations: A conceptual and measurement approach

This paper develops a conceptual framework for studying human values toward wildlife. A measurement instrument for assessing basic wildlife beliefs and wildlife value orientations concerning issues of enduring relevance to wildlife management and planning was developed using the domain sampling approach. [2]

Wildlife-habitat relationships: concepts and applications

The objective of this book is to provide in-depth information on the concepts associated with wildlife-habitat relationships. The authors’ approach combines basic field zoology and natural history, ecological theory, and quantitative tools. From their perspective, a synthesis of these topics lies at the heart of understanding all natural ecological communities. [3]

Spatial-temporal Changes in Land Use Land Cover and its Impacts on Wildlife Conservation in Meru Conservation Area, Kenya

Habitat conversion can be a major threat to biodiversity. Recent and current levels of human activities on landscapes appear to be overriding the natural changes to ecosystems brought about by climate variations in the past millennia. [4]

Indigenous Land Tenure System as a Hindrance to the Development of Pandam Wildlife Park

Pandam Wildlife Park (PWP) is home to diverse wildlife resources. Indiscriminate encroachment by surrounding communities has become major problem to sustainability of biodiversity management. For this study, semi- structured household survey questionnaire was used in four surrounding communities of the park; Pandam village, Kyarda, Aningo and Nasukuuk. A total of 1324 questionnaires were administered in the surrounding communities out of 4200 estimated households, representing about 31.5%. Data collected was analyzed using simple descriptive statistics, tables and chi- square analysis. Result revealed that about 89.5% of the land belongs to individuals in the community (customary land tenure system) as against 10.5% statutory. [5]

 

Reference

[1] Bennett, A.F., 1991. Roads, roadsides and wildlife conservation: a review. Nature conservation 2: the role of corridors.

[2] Fulton, D.C., Manfredo, M.J. and Lipscomb, J., 1996. Wildlife value orientations: A conceptual and measurement approach. Human dimensions of wildlife1(2), pp.24-47.

[3] Morrison, M.L., Marcot, B.G. and Mannan, R.W., 1999. Wildlife-habitat relationships: concepts and applications. NCASI Technical Bulletin2(781), p.371.

[4] Edwin, K., Adiel, M. and Cyprian, N. (2019) “Spatial-temporal Changes in Land Use Land Cover and its Impacts on Wildlife Conservation in Meru Conservation Area, Kenya”, Asian Journal of Environment & Ecology, 10(3), pp. 1-10. doi: 10.9734/ajee/2019/v10i330120.

[5] I. Uloko, J. and O. Yager, G. (2017) “Indigenous Land Tenure System as a Hindrance to the Development of Pandam Wildlife Park”, Asian Journal of Environment & Ecology, 5(2), pp. 1-9. doi: 10.9734/AJEE/2017/37972.

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