Transformations in soil and availability to plants of15N applied as inorganic fertilizer and legume residues

A pot experiment was conducted to review the transformations of organic and inorganic N in soil and its availability to maize plants. Inorganic N was within the form of15N labelled ammonium sulphate (As) and15N labelledSesbania aculeata (Sa), a legume, was used as organic N source. Plants utilized 20% of the N applied as As; presence of Sa reduced the uptake to 14%. Only 5% of the Sa-N was haunted by the plants and As had no effect on the supply of N from Sa. Losses of N from As were found to be 40% which were reduced to twenty in presence of Sa. Losses of N were also observed from Sa which increased within the presence of As. Application of As had no effect on the supply of soil or Sa-N. However, more As-N was transported into microbial biomass and humus components within the presence of Sa. [1]

Application of Organic and Inorganic Fertilizer for Sustainable Maize and Cowpea Yields in Nigeria

A pot experiment evaluating the influence of 5 rates each of compost, inorganic fertilizer (MFert), and combination of both fertilizers (OBF) on maize (Zea mays L.), performance was conducted within the greenhouse using three cropping cycle. This was followed by a field trial lasting four cropping seasons at Ilora within the derived savanna and at Ibadan within the forest zones of Nigeria. Maize followed by cowpea was used as test crops on the sector . Application of the fertilizers led to increases in maize and cowpea grain yields and improved the nutrient element concentrations in maize leaf tissue. Agronomic effectiveness of compost and OBF on maize relative to MFert was 88 and 118%, at Ilora and 81 and 97% at Ibadan. There was a rise of 56 and 89% Relative Agronomic Effectiveness (RAE), for compost and OBF over MFert within the residual study on cowpea. Also, the soil macro and micro nutrient status was highly improved as compared with the MFert at postharvest period. [2]

Impact of compost, manure and inorganic fertilizer on nitrate leaching and yield for a 6-year maize–alfalfa rotation in Michigan

An accurate estimate of nitrate (NO3N) leaching from agricultural land is critical to environment impact studies. Although NO3N are nearly always present in groundwater, their continued increase in managed agricultural land can cause nitrate concentrations in groundwater above acceptable human health standards. the quantity of NO3N leached during the season could also be minimal compared to leaching losses that occur between the harvest of 1 crop and therefore the planting of subsequent . during this study we compared the effect of inorganic N and raw and composted animal manure on crop productivity and N leaching under field conditions during a maize–alfalfa system using undisturbed drainage lysimeters in Michigan. The cropping system rotation consisted of three years of continuous maize (Zea mays L.) and three years of continuous alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.). One cropping system consisted of a maize crop grown within the 1994–1996 seasons and alfalfa within the 1997–1999 seasons. [3]

Fertilizer regime impacts on abundance and diversity of soil fauna across a poplar plantation chronosequence in coastal Eastern China

Soil fauna are critical for ecosystem function and sensitive to the changes of soil fertility. the consequences of fertilization on soil fauna communities, however, remain poorly understood. We examined the consequences of fertilization form and quantity on the abundance, diversity and composition of soil fauna across an age-sequence of poplar plantations (i.e., 4-, 9- and 20-yr-old) within the coastal region of eastern China. We found that the consequences of fertilization on faunal abundance, diversity, and composition differed among stand ages. Organic fertilizers increased the entire abundance of soil fauna, whereas low level inorganic fertilizers imparted increases only within the 4- and 9-yr-old stands. [4]

Comparative Assessment of the Impact of Organic and Inorganic Fertilizers Application on the Growth and Development of Solanum nigrum L. (Angiosperm; Solanaceae)

Aims: the appliance of organic and inorganic fertilizers to the soil is taken into account an honest agricultural practice because it helps to enhance the fertility of the soil and therefore the quality of plant products. However, the effect of some fertilizers on crop yield isn’t always positive in comparison with others. This study assessed, comparatively, the consequences of organic and inorganic fertilizers on the expansion and development of black nightshade L. (Angiosperm; Solanaceae).

Study Design: This was an observational field study.

Place and Duration of Study: Department of Applied Biology experimental plot, Faculty of Science, Ebonyi State University, Abakaliki from July, 2015 to September, 2015. [5]

Reference

[1] Azam, F., Malik, K.A. and Sajjad, M.I., 1985. Transformations in soil and availability to plants of 15 N applied as inorganic fertilizer and legume residues. Plant and soil, 86(1), (Web Link)

[2] Adediran, J.A., Taiwo, L.B., Akande, M.O., Sobulo, R.A. and Idowu, O.J., 2005. Application of organic and inorganic fertilizer for sustainable maize and cowpea yields in Nigeria. Journal of plant nutrition, 27(7), (Web Link)

[3] Basso, B. and Ritchie, J.T., 2005. Impact of compost, manure and inorganic fertilizer on nitrate leaching and yield for a 6-year maize–alfalfa rotation in Michigan. Agriculture, ecosystems & environment, 108(4), (Web Link)

[4] Fertilizer regime impacts on abundance and diversity of soil fauna across a poplar plantation chronosequence in coastal Eastern China
Shaojun Wang, Han Y. H. Chen, Yan Tan, Huan Fan & Honghua Ruan
Scientific Reports volume 6, (Web Link)

[5] N. Okereke, C., D. Nnama, C., U. Ekwealor, K., G. Ukpaka, C. and O. Nwogiji, C. (2017) “Comparative Assessment of the Impact of Organic and Inorganic Fertilizers Application on the Growth and Development of Solanum nigrum L. (Angiosperm; Solanaceae)”, Journal of Advances in Biology & Biotechnology, 12(4), (Web Link)

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